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Growing Tip No. 12

"When you plan your garden layout, make sure to allow room for tall plants in the back, away from shorter ones so they don't get shaded out."

 
 
 
Raspberry Organic Plants
sku: 7-2202a  

Red Raspberry plants are so wonderful and sweet. Floricane varieties start producing fruit in June and Primocane provides a second fruiting from early August through frost depending upon the variety. Great yields and large fruit perfect for backyard growing!

 
Shipping start date : 02-13-2017
Shipping end date : 05-23-2017
Planting recommendation : Early Planting
Reg. Price:  $18.95
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Nova is one of the more northerly hardy cultivars of red raspberry with very strong growing canes and medium to large fruit that is bright red and firm.  Berry flavor is superb.  Nova is very dependable and productive, and tolerates up and down spring weather better than any other raspberry. The canes of Nova seem to have the smallest spines as well.  Nova will produce a very light fall crop (on the primocanes)  if growth has been good and the fall doesn't cool down too quickly.  Hardiness zone is 3 to 8.


Heritage Red is one of the few heirloom raspberries still in production today.  While many newer cultivars have come along, Heritage  remains one of the most widely planted red raspberries in the U.S.  Dependability is the main reason for this continued support of Heritage.  Also, Heritage is one of the most widely adapted red raspberries proving productive across many different climates within our country.  Medium to large sized, bright red berries are produced on sturdy canes.  Heritage seems to better handle weather extremes than most other cultivars.  Begins to ripen the fall crop in early August.  USDA Hardiness Zones 4-9

Jaclyn canes are sturdy and vigorous.  The berry holds well to the plant,  until the berry is ripe and ready to eat, and then it just comes right off.   Jaclyn has very little premature fruit drop caused by high wind or rainstorms.  The color goes from bright red to a purplish red when ripe, and the fruit is very sweet and juicy with moderate firmness. Jaclyn ripened earlier than other cultivars I have growing on the farm, and cane height is up to 5 feet, fairly sturdy and vigorous, but we recommend staking or a trellis to hold up the beautiful, heavy fruit.  Jaclyn was the top producer of fall red raspberries in 2009, and ranked first in flavor (for three years running!) in our taste tests.  This raspberry is our number one pick for yield, earliness, and flavor.

Hardiness zone 3a to 8b.

Preparing the Soil

Raspberries and Blackberries prefer a soil pH of 5.6 to 6.2; acid soils may require applications of ground limestone to increase the pH. Soil testing information is available from your county Cooperative Extension office. You can improve the level of organic matter in the soil with good compost.

Fertilizing

At planting and every year after fruiting, use an Organic Berry Fertilizer or Organic Berry Fertilizer spikes as directed.

The Blackberry or Raspberry Plant

The crowns and roots of raspberry plants are perennial, but individual canes live two years. Each spring, the plants produce canes (suckers) from buds on the crown and on underground lateral stems. These canes grow vegetatively during the first season, overwinter, and produce fruit during the summer of the second year, while new canes emerge to provide a crop for the following year. Second-year canes die shortly after fruiting. Everbearing raspberries bear a crop on the tips of first-year canes in the fall, followed by a typical summer crop on the lower portion of the canes the second year.

It's easy to tell first-year canes from second-year canes. First-year canes have green stems, while second-year canes have a thin, brown bark covering them.

Although a wide selection of berry varieties are available, only a few will do well under the very short growing seasons and severe winters of northern New England. Select only those that are rated very hardy with early or mid-season ripening if you live in very cold areas.

In general, red raspberries are the hardiest type, followed by purple raspberries, black raspberries, and blackberries. Temperatures below 5 degrees F will injure or kill blackberry and most purple and black raspberry canes, so these should only be planted in zones 5-8.

Pruning Blackberry and Raspberry Plants

Watch the video on the left in the Helpful Videos section.

Mulching

Generous use of mulches like pine straw, sawdust, or peat moss will help control weeds, conserve moisture, and keep roots cool. Increased organic matter from decomposing mulch will help improve soil structure and nutrient uptake of plants. Replenish mulch as needed to keep the mulch depth at 2 to 4 inches.

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