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Growing Tip No. 14

‘Planting Vegetable Plants at the right time for your area is crucial.  Make sure you check for the last frost date and watch the weather carefully before planting."

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Grape Vine Thompson
sku: 7-2265a  

Classic green seedless grape widely sold in supermarkets and providing the majority of raisins consumed.  The large clusters of small tender green amber fruits can be extremely sweet and delicious when allowed to ripen fully on the vine. Ripens best in long hot dry summer climates. Late season European. Zones 7-9.


 
Stock:  41
Shipping start date : 02-18-2019
Shipping end date : 05-29-2019
Planting recommendation : Early Planting
Reg. Price:  $19.99
Price:  
$19.99
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Classic green seedless grape widely sold in supermarkets and providing the majority of raisins consumed. The large clusters of small tender green amber fruits can be extremely sweet and delicious when allowed to ripen fully on the vine. Ripens best in long hot dry summer climates. Late season European. Zones 7-9.

Grape vines not only produce sweet and versatile fruits, they add an element of drama to a garden or landscape. They are vigorous growers, and with the proper pruning, they will produce fruit with ease and can last longer than 30 years.

There are three different types of grapes: American (V. labrusca), European (V. viniferia), and North American native Muscadine (V. rotundifolia). American grapes are the most cold-hardy, while European grapes, usually more for wine than the table, do well in warm, dry, Mediterranean type zones. Hybrids are available. Thick skinned Muscadines thrive in the South.

Vigorous, 1-year-old plants are best.

PLANTING

  • Plant dormant, bare-root grape vines in the early spring.
  • Construct a trellis or arbor before planting. Grape vines will need to be trained to some sort of support to grow upward. This will also cut the risk of disease.
  • Most grape varieties are self-fertile. To be sure, ask when you are buying vines if you will need more than one plant for pollination.
  • Before planting grapevines, soak their roots in water for two or three hours.
  • Select a site with full sun. If you don’t have a spot with full sun, make sure it at least gets morning sun. A small amount of afternoon shade won’t hurt. Your soil needs to be deep, well-drained, and loose. You also need good air circulation.
  • Space vines 6 to 10 feet apart (16 feet for muscadines).
  • For each vine, dig a planting hole 12 inches deep and 12 inches wide. Fill with 4 inches of topsoil. Trim off broken roots and set the vine into the hole slightly deeper than it grew in the nursery. Cover the roots with 6 inches of soil and tamp down. Fill with the remaining soil, but don’t tamp this down.
  • Prune the top back to two or three buds at planting time.
  • Water at time of planting.

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